« Jump In | Main | obvious title »

April 25, 2009

Comments

Jenn

Hey,
Shelby had that white stuff in her IV this week! Man, it works FAST! She threw her arm above her head and immediately went into her favorite sleep position.

We have gotten empty capsules from our pharmacy to work with Riley on pill-swallowing. We've also told her that its sleep medicine...so if she wants it, then she has to learn how to swallow pills. I know Anni can do pills, maybe that's an idea?

Also, I've been amazed for years at what amazing sleepers your girls are. Its a pretty typical night here to have Riley awake 2 hours after we've tucked her in. Maybe Anni's body is just working so great now, that she doesn't need all that sleep she used to? I don't know...just trying to throw ideas out there.

Good luck...and one of these days we'll get to finish our phone call.

Jenn

Hey,
Shelby had that white stuff in her IV this week! Man, it works FAST! She threw her arm above her head and immediately went into her favorite sleep position.

We have gotten empty capsules from our pharmacy to work with Riley on pill-swallowing. We've also told her that its sleep medicine...so if she wants it, then she has to learn how to swallow pills. I know Anni can do pills, maybe that's an idea?

Also, I've been amazed for years at what amazing sleepers your girls are. Its a pretty typical night here to have Riley awake 2 hours after we've tucked her in. Maybe Anni's body is just working so great now, that she doesn't need all that sleep she used to? I don't know...just trying to throw ideas out there.

Good luck...and one of these days we'll get to finish our phone call.

Annika

Any chance she'd fall for a placebo?

moreena

Hey Annika,
I just visited you!

And, no, I don't think she would. Also, I worry about using a placebo because I am worried about what will happen in 8 years (of course I am worried 8 years into the future!) because lots of teens with transplants have huge compliance issues with taking their meds. One reason, among many floating around in the hormone-addled teenage brain, is that they somehow begin to think that they don't really need the drugs, or it's not really doing them any good. I'd hate for her to look back on that pill she took that mama told her would help her sleep, but which totally didn't, as justification for tossing the rest of her pills.

No wonder I don't sleep, either.

Jen--I hope the propofol went well for Shelby. It does work amazingly fast. But Annika hates the feeling of it going in. It's one of her Big Dreads.

Monica

Hmmm...I don't have any ideas. None of my three kids ever needed any rational quantity of sleep EVER. They wouldn't even sleep on long car rides...EVER. Even when little bitty, they would stay up until very late at night and still be up again going wild and strong before the crack of dawn....and forget naps!

UNTIL....the oldest hit her TEEN years. Suddenly now, all she wants to DO is sleep. Just when she is old enough to be really USEFUL and just when I really WANT her awake, she suddenly has developed a love of sleeping--all day long. Maybe if you can just hang in there another five years with Annika, the problem will correct itself!

Laurie P

Moreena,
Hello! My 11 year old middle son is a complete stress monster. He has trouble falling asleep most nights. Last night it was because he read an article on yahoo about this new flu weirdness going on. We have recently lost two children in our group of friends and I'm sure that isn't helping him feel safe and cozy either.
I have several bottles of lavender oil that I got from Body Shop In Home,now out of business I believe, but there is lovely lavender oil in Whole Foods as well. When he is having a particularly stressful night I will put some in my hands and rub it into his hair, on to his face and chest. It always works. My teenager generally has no trouble sleeping but on the rare occasion that he does, this works well with him too.
There are also homeopathic "pills" that you can get at HFStores that seem to work. I don't like using those because I feel as though I'm teaching them to use pills to sleep. (This from a woman who takes an ambien every night...)
Anyway... I'm sorry Anni is stressed. Hoping she gets some sleep soon.

Harriet

Let me know when you come up with a solution so I can try it with my 8 yr old daughter. Sometimes an elaborate guided relaxation story works - at least it works on the one telling the story; I'm usually asleep by the time we've gotten up to "arms." Frequently Eleanor is too, though. Good luck!

Aurora

I have no idea if it'd help Anni or anyone else, but I'm a very verbal thinker, and if I can switch my brain over to images they usually merge into dreams pretty quickly. (This as someone who never fell asleep within an hour as a kid, and it generally felt like a lot more but my clock wasn't visible in the dark so I don't really know)

I start by focusing alternately on different senses, directing my attention to sense touch in various pats of my body, then hearing, then to whatever I percieve visually, first the darkness and the random lights and colors I see in it, then to a brief, flickering series of images. Then I go back to the touch and hearing, each more briefly than before, getting my mind used to following its own directions. For awhile, I'll give myself directions about what to see, but the point is to sort of vague off into whatever images my brain generates, not with any coherent connections or story, but probably leading to one another somehow.

It usually works if I can stay focused long enough to get into it. Might work with someone else leading the beginning of it too, I haven't tried it.

moirasmom

I am sure you are on top of this but by any chance does she take her steroid at night? Somehow our schedule got switched and Moira ended up taking it with her pm meds and it made it hard to sleep...we had to switch it.

Thinking of all of you,
Sue(moirasmom)

Hannah

No helpful ideas, but many good wishes for Anni! (And for a decent night sleep.)

Did the EBV-fright turn out to be nothing? Sure hope so!

Kyla

That's too funny. Propofol, the cure for insomnia. They should sell it over the counter. LOL.

I hope you guys figure it out and she gets back to sleep soon.

Would she be able to take a little Benadryl at bedtime to kind of ease her into sleep?

kathy a.

oh, moira's mom has a point about steroids. my son was a pretty good sleeper, except when he was on steroids for his asthma.

it sounds like bed time itself has become stressful all around. a 2 hour trek toward sleep sounds really hard! my daughter was one of those kids who just did not need so much sleep, no matter how ready everyone was for her to go to sleep.

have you thought about maybe giving annika "quiet time" instead of the bed time that isn't working? a gentle beloved video might work to keep her occupied while she winds down. or books she can look at herself, or whatever else works to help her unwind herself without requiring everyone's full attention. just an idea.

Lee

No useful advice here.

Hope things improve on the sleep front soon.

Sarahlynn

Ellie's a hard-to-get-to-sleeper, too. My sympathies.

But mostly, I'm commenting to say THANK YOU for saying what you did about happy parents of elementary school kids.

Every single other parent in the world talks about how "it just gets harder" or, "it's just different, not easier."

I don't buy that. I don't buy that because 2 is SO MUCH easier than 1, despite the increased mobility and addition of temper tantrums. Maybe it's different for other moms, but for me, I can cope with A LOT when my kids are independent in the very basic ways: not in my body, not nursing, not requiring my assistance to dress or eliminate every form of bodily waste.

elswhere

We have started giving our 8-year-old insomniac girl low doses of melatonin a few times a week. It seems to help keep her on something close to the regular schedule than her night-owl tendencies were otherwise thwarting. I'm guessing you're justifiably somewhat leery about giving Annika random unprescribed pills to pop, but just thought I'd throw that into the mix.

Account Deleted

I'd second the melatonin- actually works pretty well- noticed that in adults if you take the 1mg instead of the 3mg it doesn't do much. Thyroid levels effect sleep dramatically, too. Hope she can sleep soon! That's so hard.

Marymc

A pediatrician prescribed melatonin for my 13 year old grandson. It was really helpful. He's not on steroids, but he's ADD.

Ask Anni's team if it's an option.

bj

Hilarious, really, you know?

I have two children who have never slept well. They *go* to sleep now, but then, one wakes up in the middle of the night and runs to our room. He used to stand by the bed and stare until I woke up, but now he makes his own little nest in our room. The other wakes up at 6 AM every morning, even Saturdays. And, yes, they're both school age, and manage to wipe themselves quite well. But, they can't sleep.

So, no advice, but sympathy.

Elaine

I started having sleep issues when I was about Annika's age -- couldn't sleep, and then started to panic about it after a while. What finally helped was just letting me sit up and read until I got sleepy, usually until about the time my father went to bed at midnight. My mother's theory is that I just started needing less sleep. But it wasn't every night, which makes allowing a late schedule like that okay. A bit of quiet time first might be a nice compromise.

As an adult, I often concentrate on a song to help me sleep, just keep singing it over and over inside my head. But that only helps if it's thoughts that are keeping me awake; by virtue of thinking of the song, you don't think anything else!

Philly

Well it is probably a good thing you didn't give her propofol! Michael Jackson may have actually over dossed on the drug. It is definitely not for anyone that may get addicted. Great post! Looking forwarding to reading many others. Here is the story on Jackson as well! http://www.touchyphilly.com

The comments to this entry are closed.

Falling Down, November 2004

  • Balloon in hand, my 4-year-old
    twirled across the kitchen floor,
    singing nonsense words
    in her own key.
    "It's my gift!" she declared
    to the world at large, which
    was really only me,
    sitting at the table. Enough
    twirling, and she lost
    her balance, tumbling
    to the floor in a theatrical
    slapstick of elbows and knees.

    She lay on her back
    for a few seconds,
    staring
    at the textured ceiling
    with the mysterious
    spaghetti sauce stain.
    Suddenly she
    began
    flapping her arms and legs
    there on the floor, as if to swish
    the imaginary snow
    into a snow angel.

    "Falling down is also a gift!" says she.

My Photo

Mostly here now